Wednesday, April 26, 2006

Vivian Girls









































Vivian Girls’ is a series of drawings about reencountering and approaching; about overcoming absence. Drawings of abandoned coats and odd humanlike figures represent the nature of approaching and the distance that is always underlying relationships between people; relationships, fragile and delicate like these drawings are.

Seven isolated figures keep an odd relation between themselves. All present the same formal treatment and depict a play of these humanoid figures with some sort of noodles that can be taken as extensions of their bodies.
There is some kind of spatial organisation that can be felt by the way these figures are displayed (their pose), some seated or leaned on objects. These physical elements (besides the humanoid figures) aren’t there: they are just suggested by the poses of the figures. These similarities bond the isolated drawings of each figure.

I am truing to bring up a depiction of what may be an encounter. And from that encounter (perceived by common formal treatment and placement on space), I want to bring up in a way the nature of the approach (as the nature of a storyteller… people get closer as the story gets more interesting) but also present the distance that is always underlying the relation among people. This work is a reencounter. Not that there is something that tells us that has been a former connection among them, but meaning a reencounter in group to escape the (common) isolation.






















These drawing are followed by another set of seven drawing of abandoned jackets. Some can clearly be connected with the figures since they are lying down on the invisible objects that may be the objects where these human figures are seated or leaned on. So, these jackets are wastes, dead, opened, useless. They are symbols of what is abandoned to return to a simplest basic state of being. They are also symbols for an imprisonment of the body which is now thrown away. I also abandon them by quitting the drawing process at a certain point.
It’s all about the abandoned.

3 Large Drawings

3 Large Drawings

Sun 30 Apr - Sun 28 May 2006

Andrew McQualter
André Alves
Andrés de Santiago


An exhibition taking place in both chapel and hotel, with murals and drawings by André Alves (Porto), Andrés de Santiago (Barcelona) en Andrew McQualter (Melbourne)

Also: book presentation BOOK HOTEL MARIA (see left)

ANDREW MCQUALTER was artist in residence at het Wilde Weten, Rotterdam until april 2006 and temporary guest at Hotel Mariakapel. He made a (semi)permanent mural in one of the rooms of the Hotel, which is also accesible to the public.

[...] ‘ I basically have two lines of investigation – one collaborative, which entails thinking of situations that enable me to investigate the dynamics of a relationship through a shared activity, and through that activity, looking at systems of knowledge and interaction, but in the end it is about the process by which we are all (ideally) co-creators of cultural forms (such as architecture or government). The other includes my figurative drawings, which are intended to manifest ideas about the practice of art and to create a kind of antagonism between sites of production and sites of display.’

ANDRE ALVES (Porto) is in residence at Hotel Mariakapel via the 'artist in context' programma of Pépinières Européennes pour jeunes artistes, Feb - Aug 2006. He also participates in the Kunstvlaai in Amsterdam for Hotel Mariakapel. In ‘3 large drawings’, a reference is made to the work 'Aunt Nell Gis', a large-scale drawing in progress for Kunstvlaai 06: a gigantic paper carper (12 by 14 m.), with strongly political drawings and texts.

A second work, 'Vivian Girls', is a series of drawings about reencountering and approaching; about overcoming absence. Drawings of abandoned coats and odd humanlike figures represent the nature of approaching and the distance that is always underlying relationships between people; relationships, fragile and delicate like these drawings.

ANDRES DE SANTIAGO uit Barcelona werkt in Hotel in maart en april 2006.

'Attempts on withdrawal, repetition, conscious copying, and the uniqueness of Décor'
If brave enough, the traditional perspective of facing an empty white plane nowadays (be it crafted, analogical or digital) seems more an individual act of self denial and a once or maybe twice in a lifetime statement of aesthetic bliss – apparently committed and precautious on the surface, a half baked extravagant just yearning for personal grandeur. And as such, a situationist depiction of serial detachment and performing credibility.
For even despite inherent blankness being properly installed, clarity and judgement still coat our eyes. And, while production means to mimic idealization processes, illustrative value follows the constructed fugacity of nonchalant representations and the mainstream hierarchical poses of fake abracadabra. Just as the true virtuous never dared to christen Apollo with popcorn, failure, these lines of commissioned marginalia, or a squared dot.